Tag Publication

Lipotype Shotgun Lipidomics technology in Science journal

Every scientist dreams of a report in Science. For us, this dream has just come true. The research project of one of our customers has been published by the iconic journal Science.


The research project in 60 seconds
Cell membranes contain a vast range of distinct lipid species. Their chemical differences influence the physical characteristics of membranes, such as viscosity. Thus, the lipid composition affects biological functions.

To identify the lipids involved, the research group used genetic engineering to modulate the lipid composition of bacteria. They correlated bacterial growth rates with lipid composition. From that they concluded that the level of unsaturated lipids influences cellular respiration, the conversion of nutrients into energy (e.g. ATP).

Further biological research and physical modeling confirmed the results. In the end, they could replicate their findings in yeast mitochondria, the organelle responsible for cellular respiration in animals and plants. Thus, further highlighting the importance of lipidomics in fundamental research.


All science is just as good as the research which precedes it
This publication has been added to the Lipidomics Resource Center, an online tool to empower your lipid research. It features scientific publications, white papers and industry insights. The integrated live full-text search and in-depth tag filter system will help you identify information of your interest.

Lipids are essential to life. Make them essential to your research too!


Resources

Viscous control of cellular respiration by membrane lipid composition – Science, 2018
Itay Budin, Tristan de Rond, Yan Chen, Leanne J G Chan, Christopher J Petzold, Jay D Keasling


Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter or Facebook, and subscribe to our newsletter to stay updated on lipids and lipidomics!

A good month for public access to research

July has been a great month. Three new publications with Lipotype Shotgun Lipidomics technology have been put out, and the Lipidomics Resource Center received its first major update. Read more about this!


One month – three publications

This month, three new publications with Lipotype Shotgun Lipidomics technology were published!

Paper 1: Parkinson’s disease
In Parkinson’s, excessive contacts between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum lead to abnormal lipid trafficking. This stops the release of “sleep” peptides affecting sleep patterns of patients long before they experience motor dysfunctions

Paper 2: vacciness
Adjuvants like the well-established AS03 are agents in vaccines that do not provide immunity but stimulate the immune system. However, the molecular mechanism behind AS03’s adjuvant effect had yet to be fully illuminated. These new results could be applied to design novel vaccine adjuvants

Paper 3: cancer therapeutics
Oncogenic RAS proteins must localize to the plasma membrane to act. The recently described oxanthroquinone G01 disrupts that, affects levels of some lipids and synergizes with other compounds that affect oncogenic RAS proteins. G01 could become a new anti-RAS therapeutic

As always: access the Lipidomics Resource Center to study more publications!


The first major Lipidomics Resource Center update

We strive for scientific excellence, and therefore must hold on to the fact that all science is just as good as the research which precedes it. Therefore, we created the Lipidomics Resource Center which provides access to lipidomics publications and whitepapers to empower your research. However, that is just not enough. Therefore we added a completely new category: “products”!

There is a whole universe of research which you cannot access through reading scientific publications. And that is most of industry research. However, this type of research is reflected by product development and patents. The new category “products” gives you access to exactly this kind of hidden information.

Lipidomics is no longer a thing of the lab. It is out in the world. Now, you can learn about it!


Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook or Google+, and subscribe to our newsletter to stay updated on lipids and lipidomics!

Parkinson’s Disease, Fruit Flies and Lipotype

What happened

Do fruit flies suffer from Parkinson’s? Not exactly. But patients who suffer from this neurological disease experience disturbed sleep patterns long before motor dysfunctions. This can be modelled in fruit flies. Researchers from the Netherlands and Germany showed that excessive contacts between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum in Parkinson’s flies lead to abnormal lipid trafficking. This prevents the release of “sleep” neuropeptides, which affects sleep patterns.

Lipotype performed lipid analysis on fruit fly heads and various organelles. The results clearly supported the researchers’ hypothesis: in Parkinson’s fruit flies the lipid PtdSer is transferred from the endoplasmic reticulum to the mitochondria, and converted to PtdEtn at a higher rate, when compared with healthy flies. This was proven through Lipotype Shotgun Lipidomics technology.


Read the full publication

ER Lipid Defects in Neuropeptidergic Neurons Impair Sleep Patterns in Parkinson’s Disease – Neuron, 2018
Jorge S Valadas, Giovanni Esposito, Dirk Vandekerkhove, Katarzyna Miskiewicz, Liesbeth Deaulmerie, Susanna Raitano, Philip Seibler, Christine Klein, Patrik Verstreken


Follow us on  LinkedIn,  Twitter,  Facebook or  Google+, and  subscribe to our newsletter to stay updated on lipids and lipidomics!

Lipotype performed lipid analysis of bacteria for future antimicrobial strategies

What happened

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a multi-drug resistant bacteria, and can cause serious illnesses such as pneumonia or sepsis syndromes. The publication from TU Braunschweig shows that, when grown under unaerobic biofilm conditions, the bacterium produces less of a protein, which binds specifically to the central hub of phospholipid metabolism.

With Lipotype shotgun lipidomics, a diverse response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the lipid head group and fatty acid level was demonstrated. This increased the susceptibility to a wide range of antibiotics which is important for the future development of new antimicrobial strategies.


Read the full publication

A phosphatidic acid-binding protein is important for lipid homeostasis and adaptation to anaerobic biofilm conditions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa – Biochemical Journal, 2018
Maike K Gronewald, Marco Massmig, Stefanie Hebecker, Linna Danne, Zofia Magnowska, Manfred Nimtz, Franz Narberhaus, Dieter Jahn, Dirk W Heinz, Lothar Jänsch, Jürgen Moser


Follow us on  LinkedIn,  Twitter,  Facebook or  Google+, and  subscribe to our newsletter to stay updated on lipids and lipidomics!

HOW CAN OMIC SCIENCE BE IMPROVED?

Kai Simons, founder and CEO of Lipotype, has been following the development of omic science for decades. His lifelong experience as well as his proficiency in lipids and lipidomics has led him to a detailed review.

The published article “How can Omic Science be improved?” critically analyzes the shortcomings of modern omic science, which yet could not fulfill its promise of a paradigm shift in medicine and biology. Bot, scientific evolution and present challenges of this field of research are taken into account to picture the overall view.

While the article itself focuses on lipidomics, Kai Simon’s field of expertise, all lessons learned can be applied generally to omic science.


Read the full article here:
How can Omic Science be improved? – Proteomics Journal, 2018
Kai Simons

Lipid analysis for early stages of drug discovery: Customer Reference Flagship VentureLabs

Lipotype performed lipid analysis for Flagship VentureLabs with the aim to better understand molecular compositions of chondrisomes, pharmaceutically active derivatives of mitochondria. The research of Flagship VentureLabs is on novel ways of preparation of chondrisomes that have beneficial structural characteristics, yield, concentration, stability, viability, integrity, or function. The lipidomic results facilitated the characterization of isolated chondrisomes in order to evaluate their quality and subsequently were used to file a recently published patent application.

Read more  


Read the patent application here
Methods and Compositions of Chondrisomes – United States Patent Application 20170151287, 2017
G A Von Maltzahn, J M Milwid, M Mee, J R Rubens, D Chess, K Trudeau, K Mahdaviani, J Feala

Lipotype analyzed Munich MIDY Pig Biobank samples for multi-omics studies of organ crosstalk in diabetes

Lipotype lipidomics was part of a wider study of samples from Munich MIDY Pig Biobank – an animal model to study poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. Lipidomic data clearly separated MIDY and WT samples. The detailed characterization of these samples will help to establish an unique resource for systematic studies of organ crosstalk in diabetes in a multi-organ, multi-omics dimension.

 

Read the whole publication here:

The Munich MIDY Pig Biobank – A unique resourse for studying organ crosstalk in diabetes – Molecular Metabolism, 2017
Andreas Blutke et. al.

Two publications of researchers at the Flanders Institute of Biotechnology (VIB) with Lipotype lipidomics

Lipotype Shotgun Lipidomics coupled with the novel superparamagnetic nanoparticles-based organelle purification uncovers lipid composition of plasma membrane and endosomes in storage disorder diseases.

A novel approach to analyze lysosomal dysfunctions through subcellular proteomics and lipidomics: the case of NPC1 deficiency – Scientific Reports, 2017
Arun K. Tharkeshwar, Jesse Trekker, Wendy Vermeire, Jarne Pauwels, Ragna Sannerud, David A. Priestman, Danielle te Vruchte, Katlijn Vints, Pieter Baatsen, Jean-Paul Decuypere, Huiqi Lu, Shaun Martin, Peter Vangheluwe, Johannes V. Swinnen, Liesbet Lagae, Francis Impens, Frances M. Platt, Kris Gevaert, Wim Annaert 


Lipotype Shotgun Lipidomics applied to mitochondria helps to link the lipid metabolism with the electron transport via action of phosphatase and tensin homologue–induced kinase (PINK1), a protein associated with Parkinson’s disease.

Cardiolipin promotes electron transport between ubiquinone and complex I to rescue PINK1 deficiency – The Journal of Cell Biology, 2017
Melissa Vos, Ann Geens, Claudia Böhm, Liesbeth Deaulmerie, Jef Swerts, Matteo RossiKatleen Craessaerts, Elvira P. Leites, Philip Seibler, Aleksandar Rakovic, Thora Lohnau, Bart De Strooper, Sarah-Maria Fendt, Vanessa A. Morais, Christine Klein, Patrik Verstreken


Read more about research at VIB: http://www.vib.be

 

Lipotype measures lipidomes for protein-lipid interaction study

Zhou et al. show that K-Ras C-terminal membrane anchor encodes an previously unsuspected anionic lipid binding specificity, which is realized by defined conformational structures of the anchor. Subtle changes to anchor sequence or prenylation profoundly alter its lipid specificity and is a key determinant of K-Ras signal output.

Lipotype is proud of its contribution to this exciting study.

Read the whole publication here:

Lipid-Sorting Specificity Encoded in K-Ras Membrane Anchor Regulates Signal Output – Cell, 2017
Yong Zhou, Priyanka Prakash, Hong Liang, Kwang-Jin Cho, Alemayehu A. Gorfe, John F. Hancock

Lipotype and Lund University publish about lipid profiles in Diabetes and infarction

In the latest issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association, Lipotype and Lund University published a paper in which high-throughput lipidomic screening was successfully applied to reveal molecular lipid profiles in blood serum specific for Diabetes mellitus and myocardial infarction.

Read the whole publication here:

Identification of Shared and Unique Serum Lipid Profiles in Diabetes Mellitus and Myocardial Infarction, , 2016
Sanela Kjellqvist, Christian Klose, Michal A. Surma, George Hindy, Inês G. Mollet, Anna Johansson, Patrick Chavaux, Johan Gottfries, Kai Simons, Olle Melander and Céline Fernandez