Ceramide analysis in moisturizer research

Moisturization has taken center stage in skin care research and product development for decades. New remedies for dry skin have entered and left the shelves of drugstores. Still, dry facial skin remains a major concern for consumers. Though skin biology is central to develop reliable moisturizers, researching the impact of the skin’s molecular profile has been lacking. Skin lipidomics is changing this.


Teaser

Moisturization has taken center stage in skin care research and product development for decades. Still, dry facial skin remains a major concern for consumers. The challenge here is twofold.

The first problem revolves around research about the stratum corneum, the upmost layer of the skin. One of its primary functions is to serve as a barrier to maintain hydration and regulate trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL). Its functionality is linked to its composition and structure. Among the most abundant components of the stratum corneum structure are ceramide lipids. However, cosmetics studies are mainly about body skin, hence our general understanding of the stratum corneum cannot be applied to facial skin.

Secondly, moisturizer research has largely centered around single analytical parameters than global analyte composition. Instead of researching formulations which focus on one skin parameter, expanding analysis to cover many hundreds of parameters will help unveil the secrets of the facial skin and its biochemistry. Specifically, analysis of the stratum corneum lipid matrix has been proven a promising research approach.


Resources

1 – Article: Moisturizer Research and Ceramides


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